Drug-specific and dosage effects of #statins and the risk of #cancer: a population-based cohort study in South Korea

This study aimed to investigate whether the drug-specific and dosage effects of statin use were associated with a lower risk of cancer in adults in South Korea. We evaluated the adult population registered in the 2010 sample cohort database of South Korea.

Subjects were divided into the statin group (those who had been prescribed continuous oral statin over 1 year) and the control group (those who had never been prescribed statin from 2010 to 2016). In total, 687 396 individuals were included in the analysis [statin group, 53 592 (7.8%); control group, 633 804 (92.2%)]. In a multivariable Cox model, the hazard of cancer in the statin group was 5% lower than that in the control group [hazard ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.91–0.98; P = 0.004].

Additionally, the hazard of cancer in patients receiving moderate- and high-intensity daily dosages of statin were 5% (hazard ratio, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.91–0.98; P = 0.005) and 9% (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.83–0.99; P = 0.042) lower than that of the control group, respectively. The hazard of cancer in patients receiving atorvastatin was 6% (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.90–0.98; P = 0.005) lower than that in the control group, while other types of statins showed no significant associations (all P > 0.05).

Statin use was associated with a lower risk of cancer in South Korea. This association was stronger in patients receiving moderate and high daily dosages of statin and in patients receiving atorvastatin.

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