Association Between Limited English #Proficiency and Revisits and Readmissions After #Hospitalization for Patients With Acute and Chronic Conditions in Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) in predominantly Anglophone settings face barriers to safe and high-quality health care.1,2 We examined whether emergency department (ED) visits or readmissions differed between English-proficient (EP) and LEP patients discharged with acute and chronic conditionsEP

..Patients with LEP and heart failure had an increased risk of a 30-day ED visit (21.6% vs 14.7%; RR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.12-1.55) compared with EP patients. Patients with LEP and heart failure experienced greater risk of readmission at 30 days (18.1% vs 13.9%; RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.08-1.54) and at 90 days (30.2% vs 25.7%; RR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.09-1.40). Patients with LEP and COPD also had greater risk of readmission at 30 days (15.6% vs 11.8%; RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.11-2.06) and at 90 days (26.1% vs 20.6%; RR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.06-1.65) but did not have significantly increased risk of a 30-day ED visit (17.6% vs 14.5%; RR, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.95-1.66) than did EP patients. For patients discharged with pneumonia or hip fracture, there was no significant difference in ED visits or readmissions between patients with LEP or EP

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2753354