Hospital-level variation in the development of persistent critical illness

Patients with persistent critical illness may account for up to half of all intensive care unit (ICU) bed-days. It is unknown if there is hospital variation in the development of persistent critical illness and if hospital performance affects the incidence of persistent critical illness..

In the analysis of 100 hospitals which encompassed 153,512 hospitalizations, 4.9% (N = 7640/153,512) developed persistent critical illness. There was variation in the development of persistent critical illness despite controlling for patient characteristics (intraclass correlation: 0.067, 95% CI 0.049–0.091). Hospitals with higher risk- and reliability-adjusted 30-day mortality had higher probabilities of developing persistent critical illness (predicted probability: 0.057, 95% CI 0.051–0.063, p < 0.01) compared to those with lower risk- and reliability-adjusted 30-day mortality (predicted probability: 0.046, 95% CI 0.041–0.051, p < 0.01).

The median odds ratio was 1.4 (95% CI 1.33–1.49) implying that, for two patients with the same physiology on admission at two different VA hospitals, the patient admitted to the hospital with higher adjusted mortality would have 40% greater odds of developing persistent critical illness.

Conclusion
Hospitals with higher risk- and reliability-adjusted 30-day mortality have a higher probability of developing persistent critical illness. Understanding the drivers of this variation may identify modifiable factors contributing to the development of persistent critical illness.

https://bit.ly/3h17sHR