Skeletal muscle antagonizes antiviral CD8+ T cell exhaustion

CD8+ T cells become functionally impaired or “exhausted” in chronic infections, accompanied by unwanted body weight reduction and muscle mass loss. Whether muscle regulates T cell exhaustion remains incompletely understood. We report that mouse skeletal muscle increased interleukin (IL)–15 production during LCMV clone 13 chronic infection. Muscle-specific ablation of Il15 enhanced the CD8+ T cell exhaustion phenotype. Muscle-derived IL-15 was required to maintain a population … Continue reading Skeletal muscle antagonizes antiviral CD8+ T cell exhaustion

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#Potato Protein Isolate Stimulates #Muscle Protein Synthesis at Rest and with Resistance Exercise in Young Women

Skeletal muscle myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) increases in response to protein feeding and to resistance exercise (RE), where each stimuli acts synergistically when combined. The efficacy of plant proteins such as potato protein (PP) isolate to stimulate MPS is unknown. We aimed to determine the effects of PP ingestion on daily MPS with and without RE in healthy women. In a single blind, parallel-group design, … Continue reading #Potato Protein Isolate Stimulates #Muscle Protein Synthesis at Rest and with Resistance Exercise in Young Women

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Skeletal #muscle mass in relation to 10 year #cardiovascular disease incidence among middle aged and older adults: the ATTICA study

Skeletal muscle mass (SMM) is inversely associated with cardiometabolic health and the ageing process. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the relation between SMM and 10 year cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence, among CVD-free adults 45+ years old. The 10 year CVD incidence increased significantly across the baseline SMI tertiles (p<0.001). Baseline SMM showed a significant inverse association with the 10 year CVD incidence (HR 0.06, 95% CI … Continue reading Skeletal #muscle mass in relation to 10 year #cardiovascular disease incidence among middle aged and older adults: the ATTICA study

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